Past Exhibitions

FANTASTIC ARCHITECTURE: VOSTELL, FLUXUS, AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

January 22, 2017 – March 17, 2017

Taking its title and inspiration from the seminal publication Fantastic Architecture (1970), edited by Wolf Vostell and Dick Higgins and published by Something Else Press, this exhibition presents various approaches to architecture, urban space, and the built environment within an international community of artists associated with Fluxus and conceptual art in the 1960s and 1970s. Fantastic Architecture is presented in conjunction with the re-siting, following a major conservation treatment, of Wolf Vostell’s Concrete Traffic (1970), a monumental event-sculpture in the University of Chicago’s Campus Art Collection. The exhibition contextualizes Concrete Traffic in relation to Vostell’s other related works from the period, including photomontage proposals for alterations to architectural and urban spaces and event scores for happenings intended for specific cities, as well as the work of his artistic peers and interlocutors. In Europe and the United States alike, the postwar period saw massive transformations of the urban landscape, the construction and expansion of freeway systems, and the rise of automobile culture, and artists of the time responded to these developments in a variety of ways. Like its eponymous exemplar, the exhibition embraces the porousness and intellectual foment of the experimental art world of the time, a context in which forms and concepts circulated among an international community of artists. The exhibition includes works by Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Douglas Huebler, Allan Kaprow, Shigeko Kubota, Rosemary Mayer, Jim McWilliams, and Wolf Vostell.


Curated by Jacob Proctor
Presented by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society, with additional support from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

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ANNA TSOUHLARAKIS: SHE MADE FOR HER

November 1, 2016 – January 13, 2017

Working across a range of media, Anna Tsouhlarakis has developed an artistic practice that explores themes of Native American identity through resolutely contemporary means. With a body of work that includes sculpture, video, performance, photography, and installation, Tsouhlarakis aims to expand the terms of what constitutes Native aesthetics, pushing viewers to confront and rethink their own cultural expectations when encountering the work of Native artists. For her exhibition at the Neubauer Collegium—presented as part of the collaborative research project Open Fields—Tsouhlarakis has created a group of three new large-scale sculptures, constructed using materials sourced from the “as is” section of Swedish furniture retailer IKEA and accompanied by a multi-channel sound installation. As viewers encounter Tsouhlarakis’s sculptures, the visual experience of each works is mediated by the recorded voices of other Native women describing their experience of the same objects: some approach them as abstractions, some as utilitarian forms, and others as connections to mythic stories. Collectively, these new works question the authority bestowed upon or ascribed to both individuals and institutions, and make a compelling case for the aesthetic and epistemological contribution that contemporary Native American artists might make to the current articulation of a long-standing historical tradition.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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JAKOB KOLDING
September 21 – October 26, 2016

Jakob Kolding’s work has long revolved around the experience of life in the contemporary built environment, particularly the relationships and contradictions that emerge between how architectural spaces are planned and how they are actively used. His works incorporate a wide range of source material, sampling and mixing the visual idioms of modernist art and architecture, sociological inquiry, and such popular cultural forms as hip-hop and electronic music. Reflecting a strong scenographic turn in Kolding’s recent practice, the exhibition centers on a group of sculptural figures made from photomontage prints mounted on life-sized wooden armatures.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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LUKE FOWLER
April 29 - July 1, 2016

The Neubauer Collegium is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Glagow-based artist, filmmaker and musician Luke Fowler, including the North American premiere of his latest film, For Christian (2016), a cinematic portrait of New York School composer Christian Wolff. Challenging the limits and conventions of documentary form, this new 16mm film continues the artist’s ongoing investigations into vanguard thinkers and cultural producers, such as the radical psychiatrist R.D. Laing, Marxist historian E.P. Thompson, or avant-garde composer Cornelius Cardew, figures who are themselves often outsiders to dominant social and historical discourses. Within the exhibition, For Christian is accompanied by Fowler’s rarely seen Tenement Films (2009). Shot and edited on a single 16mm Bolex camera using only available light, the Tenement Films present a series of short, intimate portraits of four otherwise diverse individuals brought together by their shared residence in a Glasgow tenement.

Also on view will be two recent suites of color photographs, one shot in the home of Italian photographer Luigi Ghirri (1943-1992), the other in the studio for electronic music at the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR), or West German Radio, in Cologne. The first of its kind anywhere in the world, the WDR studio played a key role in the development of electronic music in the postwar period, especially under the artistic direction of composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. While their mode of display initially suggests the systematic logic of the archive, their idiosyncratic typologies resist any drive toward completeness or resolution. And, like his films, Fowler’s casual, even prosaic images document the overlooked subjects, interstitial spaces, and accidental poetry of everyday reality.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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IAN KIAER: ENDNOTE, LEDOUX
February 26 - April 22, 2016

Neubauer Collegium Exhibitions presents new works by London-based artist Ian Kiaer, whose exhibitions take the form of carefully composed landscapes of found objects and materials, architectural models, paintings and sculptures, and projections. Ways of exploring paradigms and testing concepts, these arrangements tend to be provisional rather than permanent, and the questions they raise—What exactly constitutes the category of “painting” today? How do we understand the relationship between sculptural fragment and architectural model?—are both deeply historical and necessarily contingent on their immediate context.

The new works in Endnote, Ledoux continue a larger project that stems from the artist’s longstanding preoccupation with a volume of engravings by the eighteenth-century French architect Claude Nicholas Ledoux, in particular the image of Ledoux’s experimental design for a spherical house for the agricultural guards of Maupertuis. In this visionary image—a building as an uncompromising sphere set in an Arcadian landscape—Kiaer sensed a concern for geometry and symmetry that resonated with the architecture of the Neubauer Collegium's building itself, a former Unitarian seminary on the periphery of The University of Chicago campus.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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VICTOR BURGIN: PRAIRIE
November 20, 2015 – January 29, 2016

Neubauer Collegium Exhibitions is pleased to present the premiere exhibition of Prairie, a new digital projection work by Victor Burgin. Prairie was created as part of Overlay, a collaborative research project undertaken in Spring 2015 by Burgin and D. N. Rodowick with the support of the University of Chicago’s Gray Center For Arts and Inquiry. Overlay focused on the history of “The Mecca” apartment building, built in 1892 and demolished sixty years later as part of the expansion of the Illinois Institute of Design under the plan of Mies van der Rohe, whose Crown Hall now occupies its former site. As in Burgin's recent works, A Place to Read, focused on an Istanbul coffee house by Sedad Haki Eldem, and Mirror Lake, which turns around the Wisconsin “Seth Peterson Cottage” by Frank Lloyd Wright, Prairie responds to specific architectural sites (here, The Mecca and Crown Hall) and explores erased or disappeared cultural histories, real and/or imagined, inscribed in the built environment.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

Presented as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

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PETRA ANDREJOVA-MOLNÁR – CONTRIBUTION AND COLLABORATION
Katarina Burin

September 16 – November 13, 2015

An exhibition of works attributed to the Czechoslovakian architect Petra Andrejova-Molnár, an overlooked figure active in the first half of the twentieth century, as realized by artist Katarina Burin in the form of architectural models, drawings, furniture and design objects, photographs, and texts. In presenting Andrejova-Molnár’s work, and the scholarly apparatus around it, Burin simultaneously inserts her into and subtly destabilizes the established canon of architectural history—lending voice to female designers while also questioning notions of authorship and authenticity, the relationship between gender and the archive, and the historical tension between national identity and internationalist aspiration. The project highlights the ways in which historical movements and utopian ideologies are complicated and contradictory formations in a constant state of flux, while also creating a space of play around the mythos of “the architect.”

Curated by Jacob Proctor

Presented as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Support for this exhibition and publication is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

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NO LONGER ART: SALVAGE ART INSTITUTE

April 23 – July 10, 2015

Drawn from the art insurance lexicon, the term “salvage art” refers to works removed from art circulation due to accidental damage. Salvage pieces are subject to a peculiar and transformative actuarial logic. Once “total loss” status has been declared and indemnification has been paid, salvage art is considered officially devoid of value. Its objects are cast into art’s nether world, no longer alive for the market, gallery, or museum system, but often still relatively intact. Salvage art is liberated from the burden of constant valuation and the obligation of exchange, yet abandoned to the invisibility of perpetual storage.

Founded by Elka Krajewska, the Salvage Art Institute (SAI) supplies a refuge for salvaged art pieces. The survival of salvage art even past its total devaluation confronts our common understanding of where art ends, disturbing the distinction, organization, and separation of art from non-art. The SAI offers a platform for exposing, viewing, and encountering the condition of salvage art and provides a forum for engaging the regulation of its financial, aesthetic, and social value.

The Salvage Art Institute’s mandate is to maintain the separation of value from its no longer art inventory. No Longer Art: Salvage Art Institute follows this objective, simultaneously opening the inventory to scrutiny while attempting to momentarily suspend the force of attraction between its objects and value.

No Longer Art: Salvage Art Institute was produced by GSAPP Exhibitions, Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery, Columbia University, and the Salvage Art Institute. Curated by Elka Krajewska and Mark Wasiuta. Exhibition design by Adam Bandler, Elka Krajewska, and Mark Wasiuta. Graphic design by MTWTF. The exhibition was developed with the participation of AXA Art Insurance Corporation

No Longer Art: Salvage Art Institute was presented at the University of Chicago by Neubauer Collegium Exhibitions in partnership with the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry, with additional support from the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory.

Related Programming:

Salvage Symposium: Salvage Art 2.0

Salvage Symposium: Salvage Art 2.1

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