Philosophy of Revolution

Monday, May 21 - Tuesday, May 22

Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society
5701 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60637

“Philosophy of Revolution," sponsored by the Revolutionology: Media and Networks of Intellectual Revolution Faculty Research Project, asks how the revolutions of the twentieth century—primarily 1917 and 1968—have stimulated philosophical work and what it means to think philosophically about revolution. Several speakers will investigate the subterranean genealogies of philosophical reflections on revolution in the 1960s, showing how revolutionary ideas travel in sometimes surprising ways. Others will take a fresh look at dialogues between Soviet philosophy and seemingly quite distant intellectual and creative communities, like Black America. A third group of speakers will focus on revolutionary dialogues between critical theorists and artists. Over the two days we hope to identify a clear set of hypotheses about what revolution makes visible and thinkable in our world, and how this philosophical reflex informs new revolutionary praxis.

CONFERENCE AGENDA

May 21

9:30 – 10:00
Welcome and Introduction
Robert Bird (University of Chicago) 

10:00 – 11:00 am 
Davide Stimilli (University of Colorado Boulder) on Hannah Arendt and the Italians

11:15 am – 12:15 pm
Robert Bird (University of Chicago) on Raoul Vaneigem and the Russians

12:15 – 1:30 pm
Break

1:30 – 2:30 pm
Alexei Penzin (University of Wolverhampton) on speculative aspects of late Soviet philosophy (Mikhail Lifshits and Eval’d Il’enkov)

2:45 – 3:45 pm
Keti Chukhrov (National Research University of Higher Economics) on Georg Lukacs and Mikhail Lifshits

4:00 – 5:00 pm
Jonathan Flatley (Wayne State University) on Ralph Ellison’s Black Leninism

May 22

10:00 – 11:00 am
Josh Kotin (Princeton University) on Amiri Baraka

11:15 am – 12:15 pm
Jeremy Glick (Hunter College) on Frantz Fanon and Gillo Pontecorvo

12:15 – 1:30 pm
Break

1:30 – 2:30 pm
Elettra Stimilli (Università di Roma La Sapienza) on the "spectator" in Benjamin and Foucault

2:45 – 3:45 pm
Karen Pinkus (Cornell University) on Deleuze and Guattari with Robert Smithson on geo-revolutions

4:00 – 5:00 pm
Concluding Discussion

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