2015 Exhibitions

VICTOR BURGIN: PRAIRIE
November 20, 2015 – January 29, 2016

This exhibition featured the premiere of Prairie, a new digital projection work by Victor Burgin. Prairie was created as part of Overlay, a collaborative research project undertaken in Spring 2015 by Burgin and D. N. Rodowick with the support of the University of Chicago’s Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry. Overlay focused on the history of “The Mecca” apartment building, built in 1892 and demolished sixty years later as part of the expansion of the Illinois Institute of Design under the plan of Mies van der Rohe, whose Crown Hall now occupies its former site. As in Burgin's recent works, A Place to Read, focused on an Istanbul coffee house by Sedad Haki Eldem, and Mirror Lake, which turns around the Wisconsin “Seth Peterson Cottage” by Frank Lloyd Wright, Prairie responds to specific architectural sites (here, The Mecca and Crown Hall) and explores erased or disappeared cultural histories, real and/or imagined, inscribed in the built environment.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

Presented as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

Details >>

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PETRA ANDREJOVA-MOLNÁR: CONTRIBUTION AND COLLABORATION
Katarina Burin
September 16 – November 13, 2015

This exhibition included works attributed to the Czechoslovakian architect Petra Andrejova-Molnár, an overlooked figure active in the first half of the twentieth century, as realized by artist Katarina Burin in the form of architectural models, drawings, furniture and design objects, photographs, and texts. In presenting Andrejova-Molnár’s work, and the scholarly apparatus around it, Burin simultaneously inserted her into and subtly destabilized the established canon of architectural history—lending voice to female designers while also questioning notions of authorship and authenticity, the relationship between gender and the archive, and the historical tension between national identity and internationalist aspiration. The project highlighted the ways in which historical movements and utopian ideologies are complicated and contradictory formations in a constant state of flux, while also creating a space of play around the mythos of “the architect.”

Curated by Jacob Proctor

Presented as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Support for this exhibition and publication is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Photos >>

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NO LONGER ART: SALVAGE ART INSTITUTE
April 23 – July 10, 2015

Drawn from the art insurance lexicon, the term “salvage art” refers to works removed from art circulation due to accidental damage. Salvage pieces are subject to a peculiar and transformative actuarial logic. Once “total loss” status has been declared and indemnification has been paid, salvage art is considered officially devoid of value. Its objects are cast into art’s nether world, no longer alive for the market, gallery, or museum system, but often still relatively intact. Salvage art is liberated from the burden of constant valuation and the obligation of exchange, yet abandoned to the invisibility of perpetual storage.

Founded by Elka Krajewska, the Salvage Art Institute (SAI) supplies a refuge for salvaged art pieces. The survival of salvage art even past its total devaluation confronts our common understanding of where art ends, disturbing the distinction, organization, and separation of art from non-art. The SAI offers a platform for exposing, viewing, and encountering the condition of salvage art and provides a forum for engaging the regulation of its financial, aesthetic, and social value.

The Salvage Art Institute’s mandate is to maintain the separation of value from its no longer art inventory. No Longer Art: Salvage Art Institute followed this objective, simultaneously opening the inventory to scrutiny while attempting to momentarily suspend the force of attraction between its objects and value.

No Longer Art: Salvage Art Institute was produced by GSAPP Exhibitions, Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery, Columbia University, and the Salvage Art Institute. Curated by Elka Krajewska and Mark Wasiuta. Exhibition design by Adam Bandler, Elka Krajewska, and Mark Wasiuta. Graphic design by MTWTF. The exhibition was developed with the participation of AXA Art Insurance Corporation. Presented in partnership with the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry, with additional support from the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory.

Photos >>