2016 Exhibitions

ANNA TSOUHLARAKIS: SHE MADE FOR HER
November 1, 2016 – January 13, 2017

Working across a range of media, Anna Tsouhlarakis has developed an artistic practice that explores themes of Native American identity through resolutely contemporary means. With a body of work that includes sculpture, video, performance, photography, and installation, Tsouhlarakis aims to expand the terms of what constitutes Native aesthetics, pushing viewers to confront and rethink their own cultural expectations when encountering the work of Native artists. For her exhibition at the Neubauer Collegium—presented as part of the collaborative research project Open Fields—Tsouhlarakis created a group of three new large-scale sculptures, constructed using materials sourced from the “as is” section of Swedish furniture retailer IKEA and accompanied by a multi-channel sound installation. As viewers encountered Tsouhlarakis’s sculptures, the visual experience of each work was mediated by the recorded voices of other Native women describing their experience of the same objects. Some approached them as abstractions, some as utilitarian forms, and others as connections to mythic stories. Collectively, these new works question the authority bestowed upon or ascribed to both individuals and institutions, and make a compelling case for the aesthetic and epistemological contribution that contemporary Native American artists might make to the current articulation of a long-standing historical tradition.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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JAKOB KOLDING: MAKING A SCENE
September 21 – October 26, 2016

Jakob Kolding’s work has long revolved around the experience of life in the contemporary built environment, particularly the relationships and contradictions that emerge between how architectural spaces are planned and how they are actively used. His works incorporate a wide range of source material, sampling and mixing the visual idioms of modernist art and architecture, sociological inquiry, and such popular cultural forms as hip-hop and electronic music. Reflecting a strong scenographic turn in Kolding’s recent practice, the exhibition centered on a group of sculptural figures made from photomontage prints mounted on life-sized wooden armatures.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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LUKE FOWLER
April 29 - July 1, 2016

This exhibition of new works by Glagow-based artist, filmmaker, and musician Luke Fowler included the North American premiere of his latest film, For Christian (2016), a cinematic portrait of New York School composer Christian Wolff. Challenging the limits and conventions of documentary form, the 16mm film continued the artist’s ongoing investigations into vanguard thinkers and cultural producers, such as the radical psychiatrist R.D. Laing, Marxist historian E.P. Thompson, or avant-garde composer Cornelius Cardew, figures who are themselves often outsiders to dominant social and historical discourses. Within the exhibition, For Christian was accompanied by Fowler’s rarely seen Tenement Films (2009). Shot and edited on a single 16mm Bolex camera using only available light, the Tenement Films present a series of short, intimate portraits of four otherwise diverse individuals brought together by their shared residence in a Glasgow tenement.

Also on view were two recent suites of color photographs, one shot in the home of Italian photographer Luigi Ghirri (1943-1992), the other in the studio for electronic music at the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR), or West German Radio, in Cologne. The first of its kind anywhere in the world, the WDR studio played a key role in the development of electronic music in the postwar period, especially under the artistic direction of composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. While their mode of display initially suggests the systematic logic of the archive, their idiosyncratic typologies resist any drive toward completeness or resolution. And, like his films, Fowler’s casual, even prosaic images document the overlooked subjects, interstitial spaces, and accidental poetry of everyday reality.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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IAN KIAER: ENDNOTE, LEDOUX
February 26 - April 22, 2016

Neubauer Collegium Exhibitions presented new works by London-based artist Ian Kiaer, whose exhibitions take the form of carefully composed landscapes of found objects and materials, architectural models, paintings and sculptures, and projections. Ways of exploring paradigms and testing concepts, these arrangements tend to be provisional rather than permanent, and the questions they raise—What exactly constitutes the category of “painting” today? How do we understand the relationship between sculptural fragment and architectural model?—are both deeply historical and necessarily contingent on their immediate context.

The new works in Endnote, Ledoux continued a larger project that stems from the artist’s longstanding preoccupation with a volume of engravings by the eighteenth-century French architect Claude Nicholas Ledoux, in particular the image of Ledoux’s experimental design for a spherical house for the agricultural guards of Maupertuis. In this visionary image—a building as an uncompromising sphere set in an Arcadian landscape—Kiaer sensed a concern for geometry and symmetry that resonated with the architecture of the Neubauer Collegium's building itself, a former Unitarian seminary on the periphery of the University of Chicago campus.

Curated by Jacob Proctor

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