Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society Organization Logo Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society

Events

Intellectual collaborations thrive in environments where ideas are shared, freely and respectfully, among people representing different backgrounds and perspectives. This is why the Neubauer Collegium regularly opens its inquiries and conversations to the public.

Toggle View

  • Grid
  • List

Results:

Lea Ypi on "Dignity and Historical Injustice"

Lea Ypi
Director's Lecture

Lea Ypi on "Dignity and Historical Injustice"

At this Director's Lecture, political theorist Lea Ypi will reflect on the moral and political meanings of dignity.

At this Director’s Lecture, political theorist Lea Ypi will read and discuss a chapter from her forthcoming book on dignity, an Albanian family’s history. Ypi will explore the moral and political meanings of dignity (both individual and collective) in connection to questions of truth, reconciliation, historical injustice, and the relationship between facts and fiction.

Rubenstein Forum

Cultivation without Domestication and Urbanism without Cities in Ancient Amazonia

Aerial image of Ras al-Silaysil, Jordan
Lecture

Cultivation without Domestication and Urbanism without Cities in Ancient Amazonia

Eduardo Góes Neves will argue that any approach to understanding the deep past of the Amazon forest must go beyond the realm of archaeology.

At the end of the 16th century AD, the Amazon forest was occupied by around 10 million Indigenous peoples. They had lived there since the Terminal Pleistocene, but by the early 1700s about 90 percent of them had perished. Over the course of millennia, those people had substantially transformed the Amazon. Transformations happened on such a scale that one is forced to accept that the Amazon is as much cultural as it is natural. In addition to ancient orchards embedded in the forest and patches of rich fertile soils, one finds traces of earthen architecture in the form of ditches, roads, embankments, and mounds. Such built spaces are directly connected to people’s lives today, even when there is no direct link between peoples of the past and the present. In the Amazon, any effective approach to understanding the deep past must look for traces that go beyond the realm of the materiality of the archaeological record. This may be the case in other tropical settings still poorly known to archaeologists, such as Central Africa and Melanesia. Where forests are ruins, a comparative global history may have to be a comparative natural history as well.

This event is presented as part of a lecture series jointly organized by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society and the Institute for the Formation of Knowledge at the University of Chicago.

The Institute for the Formation of Knowledge

Opening Reception for The Chicago Cli-Fi Library

Inigo Manglano-Ovalle, 18 West 11th Street, March 6, 1970, 2006.
Exhibition

Opening Reception for The Chicago Cli-Fi Library

This exhibition is a modest attempt to make sense of the paralysis that sets in when artists try to fashion a response to climate change.

Climate change is a great existential crisis for humanity, yet the apocalyptic prospect of global warming and other consequences of this great disruption hardly make themselves felt in the mainstream of cultural production. Whether we consider art, film, literature or music, the specter of climate change has yet to produce the Anthropocene’s defining masterpieces. One could make the case that it is the very enormity of the challenge of imagining the unimaginable that causes this creative paralysis. The Chicago Cli-Fi Library is a modest attempt to make sense of this paralysis, suggesting that art’s response to the complexity and enormity of the issue at hand can only ever be piecemeal, ad hoc, and hyperlocalized – all of which must be understood as virtuous. Named after the emerging literary genre of “climate fiction,” or “cli-fi,” and accordingly bookish in both conception and outlook, this exhibition will feature the work of Chicago-based artists Beate Geissler & Oliver Sann, Jenny Kendler, Inigo Manglano-Ovalle, and Dan Peterman. Curated by Dieter Roelstraete.

Please join us for a reception to celebrate the opening of this exhibition.

Neubauer Collegium

An Evening with The Crossing

Director's Lecture

An Evening with The Crossing

The award-winning chamber choir will ignite new curiosities at this concert, featuring a program of newly commissioned choral works.

A champion of new music, The Crossing is committed to commissioning works that expand and reinvent choral compositional practices. Having premiered pieces by many of today’s leading composers, the chamber choir will broaden the audience's expectations and ignite new curiosities in this concert of choral works by Ayanna Woods, Caroline Shaw, Edie Hill, Shara Nova, and Jennifer Higdon. Q&A with the artists immediately following.

This event is organized by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society and UChicago Presents in partnership with the Humanities Division, the Provost’s Office, and the Department of Music at the University of Chicago. The performance is presented as part of the Director’s Lecture series at the Neubauer Collegium.

Rubenstein Forum