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Research Project

Migrations in Literature

2024 – 2025

Reena Saini Kallat, Woven Chronicle (detail), 2011–19. Installation view, When Home Won’t Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art, Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston. Photo by Charles Mayer. © Reena Saini Kallat.

Key Question

Project Summary

By developing a vocabulary and roadmap for bringing histories of migration and of literature into a mutually illuminating relation, this project will explore what is lost in the attempt to represent migration, and also what is produced or preserved.

Topics

Research Team

Hadji Bakara

Hadji Bakara

Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature

University of Michigan

Hadji Bakara is Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. He is the editor of a special issue of JNT: Journal of Narrative Theory on “Refugee Literatures,” and his writing on human rights and migration has appeared in PMLA, American...

Nate Crocker

Nate Crocker

Doctoral Candidate, English Department

University of Chicago

Nate Crocker is a doctoral candidate in the English department at the University of Chicago. He is currently working on a project about aurality, atmospheres, and national music culture during the Romantic period, entitled National Airs.

Josephine McDonagh

Josephine McDonagh

George M. Pullman Professor of English

University of Chicago

McDonagh's research and teaching focus on 19th-century British literature, especially in the contexts of colonialism, imperial expansion, and the migration of people across the world. McDonagh ranges across authors, genres and print forms, and explores questions about the kinds of knowledge that...

Charlotte Sussman

Charlotte Sussman

Professor of English

Duke University

Charlotte Sussman is Professor of English at Duke. She is the author of Peopling the World: Representing Human Mobility from Milton to Malthus, Consuming Anxieties: Consumer Protest, Gender, and British Slavery, 1713-1833, and Eighteenth-Century British Literature, 1660-1789. ...

Project Narrative

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